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submitted 4 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

The original page 13 of the Codex Borbonicus, showing the 13th trecena of the Aztec sacred calendar. This 13th trecena was under the auspices of the goddess Tlazolteotl, who is shown on the upper left wearing a flayed skin, giving birth to Cinteotl. The 13 day-signs of this trecena, starting with 1 Earthquake, 2 Flint/Knife, 3 Rain, etc., are shown on the bottom row and the right column.

The Codex Borbonicus is one of a very few Aztec codices that survived the colonial Spanish inquisition. When the Spanish conquistadors (led by Hernán Cortés) entered Aztec cities, they would often find libraries filled with thousands of native works. However, most of the works were destroyed during the conquest as a means to hasten the conversion of the Aztec to European ideals.

[-] [email protected] 11 points 3 days ago

There is no inherent meaning; everyone must find their own.

For me, it's to try and leave my little patch of the world better than I found it.

[-] [email protected] 14 points 3 days ago

If only public opinion mattered more than billionaire lobbying.

[-] [email protected] 40 points 3 days ago* (last edited 3 days ago)

Cruz said, "there are many, many wonderful, wonderful working men and women in the state of New York, but everyone understands that the values in New York City are socially liberal or pro-abortion or pro- gay-marriage, [and] focus around money and the media.

Said the podcast host who is begging billionaires for money. Fuck this waste of skin.

[-] [email protected] 18 points 6 days ago* (last edited 6 days ago)

I live in the Bible belt and can tell you: the evangelical megachurches are chock full of Christian nationalists.

Sure, there are factions in the GOP that don't really care about religion , but the SCOTUS wouldn't have overturned Roe if the hardcore religious zealots didn't work for decades to get it done.

The protesters at abortion clinics were bussed there by the churches a lot of the time; they're not outliers here. They are the engine that runs the party here in Texas. They have all kinds of excuses as to why Trump is doing God's will despite being a terrible human being.

[-] [email protected] 5 points 6 days ago

Doing full co-op with a randomizer is a blast.

[-] [email protected] 34 points 6 days ago

Why?

Some of the worst people I've ever known were from when I had to go.

[-] [email protected] 0 points 6 days ago* (last edited 6 days ago)

So much of forensics is cargo-cult "science" that starts with a conclusion and works backwards to prove it. Furthermore, the analysis is frequently subjective and without a control.

Here is an article on ballistics testing in particular that highlights some criticisms.

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submitted 6 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Le Roman de la Rose (The Romance of the Rose) is a medieval poem written in Old French and presented as an allegorical dream vision. As poetry, The Romance of the Rose is a notable instance of courtly literature, purporting to provide a "mirror of love" in which the whole art of romantic love is disclosed. Its two authors conceived it as a psychological allegory; throughout the Lover's quest, the word Rose is used both as the name of the titular lady and as an abstract symbol of female sexuality. The names of the other characters function both as personal names and as metonyms illustrating the different factors that lead to and constitute a love affair. Its long-lasting influence is evident in the number of surviving manuscripts of the work, in the many translations and imitations it inspired, and in the praise and controversy it inspired.

The Romance of the Rose was both popular and controversial. One of the most widely read works in France through the Renaissance, it was possibly the most read book in Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries. Its emphasis on sensual language and imagery, along with its supposed promulgation of misogyny, provoked attacks by Jean Gerson, Christine de Pizan, Pierre d'Ailly, and many other writers and moralists of the 14th and 15th centuries. The historian Johan Huizinga has written: "It is astonishing that the Church, which so rigorously repressed the slightest deviations from dogma of a speculative character, suffered the teaching of this breviary of the aristocracy (for the Roman de la Rose was nothing else) to be disseminated with impunity."

The entire manuscript can be viewed online here.

[-] [email protected] 0 points 1 week ago

Improved Gyro To Mouse behavior when connected over bluetooth.

Wish they added more details; this could be big or not much at all.

[-] [email protected] 16 points 1 week ago

Watterson really is the GOAT comic strip illustrator. Lots of great panels in this one.

[-] [email protected] 15 points 1 week ago

Here is an article with some good examples of the racist shit PragerU slops around like an incontinent hippo.

[-] [email protected] 36 points 1 week ago

"Calling me a liar is a violation of my free speech! You can't say that!"

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submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Lear's illustrations were produced using lithography, in which artists copied their paintings onto a fine-textured limestone slab using a special waxy crayon. The block was then treated with nitric acid and gum arabic to etch away the parts of the stone not protected by the wax. The etched surface was wetted before adding an oil-based ink, which would be held only by the greasy crayon lines, and copies were printed from the stone. The printed plates were hand-coloured, mainly by young women.

Lear drew directly on to the limestone instead of first making a painting and then copying it onto the stone, thus saving him considerable expense. Although this method was technically more difficult, drawing directly onto stone could give a livelier feel to the final illustration, and was favoured by some other contemporary bird artists such as John Gerrard Keulemans. Lear largely taught himself lithographic techniques, using stones hired at the studio of his printer, Charles Joseph Hullmandel. Hullmandel was the author of The Art of Drawing on Stone (1824), and the leading exponent of lithographic printing in Britain. His colourists used egg white to give a sheen to the parrot's plumage and a shine to the bird's eye.

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submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Honoré-Victorin Daumier was a French painter, sculptor, and printmaker, whose many works offer commentary on the social and political life in France, from the Revolution of 1830 to the fall of the second Napoleonic Empire in 1870. He earned a living producing caricatures and cartoons in newspapers and periodicals such as La Caricature and Le Charivari, for which he became well known in his lifetime and is still remembered today. He was a republican democrat (working class liberal), who satirized and lampooned the monarchy, politicians, the judiciary, lawyers, the bourgeoisie, as well as his countrymen and human nature in general.

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submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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Common Grackle (lemmy.world)
submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Drawn in 64 x 64

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submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

A very early depiction of the Buddha.

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Mallard (lemmy.world)
submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Drawn at 128 x 128

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Mallard (lemmy.world)
submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Drawn at 128 x 128

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Goose (lemmy.world)
submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Experiment with low-res art

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submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

For all the stylistic evolution, certain features of Degas's work remained the same throughout his life. He always painted indoors, preferring to work in his studio from memory, photographs, or live models. The figure remained his primary subject; his few landscapes were produced from memory or imagination. It was not unusual for him to repeat a subject many times, varying the composition or treatment. He was a deliberative artist whose works, as Andrew Forge has written, "were prepared, calculated, practiced, developed in stages. They were made up of parts. The adjustment of each part to the whole, their linear arrangement, was the occasion for infinite reflection and experiment." Degas explained, "In art, nothing should look like chance, not even movement". He was most interested in the presentation of his paintings, patronizing Pierre Cluzel as a framer, and disliking ornate styles of the day, often insisting on his choices for the framing as a condition of purchase.

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Zombiepirate

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